What held me back from having a great period for years. (Even after I went to Nutrition School)

love your period

It’s common in our culture to disdain that time of the month when we bleed.  Our commercials for period accessories try to prove how great they are by showing how they help us completely ignore our periods all together.

When I got my first period in middle school my mom sort of just said Ok, here’s a tampon, good luck. There was certainly no celebration of entering womanhood or passing on of womanly wisdom.  I did get a discreet envelope during my 5th grade “sex ed” class full of intimidating pillow sized pads.  That was super helpful. I got the message: we don’t really talk about this, except maybe to complain.

That message has been reaffirmed throughout my adult life.  I didn’t actually learn about how to chart ovulation or connect with the lunar cycle until I was much much older.  And in the meantime, I assumed that dramatic PMS symptoms like cramps, drastic mood swings, clumpy or heavy bleeding were just normal.  After all, isn’t this why we were supposed to complain all the time?

Turns out, I was wrong.

I wish someone would have told me in my early twenties that not getting my period for months at a time was not a cause for medication but actually about my strict calorie counting, self-loathing and obsessive exercising.

I wish someone would have introduced me to the idea that my lunar cycle is a celebration of womanhood, the potential for motherhood, and a unique opportunity to gently cleanse every single month.

I wish someone would have helped me understand the impact nourishment, rest and reflection would have on those “unavoidable” symptoms.

I wish someone would have passed on some wise woman wisdom about herbal, nutritional and yoga therapeutic remedies to help regulate my hormone production so my body didn’t feel the need to get my attention every month.  The role my liver, thyroid and adrenal function played in having a consistent cycle.

I wish someone would have told me about the toxic chemicals in most period accessories.

I wish someone would have taught me to love my period.

What if you could have a great period?

Ignoring it was the problem. It held me back.

I was talking to a client the other day who ignored the severe pain she was having for a year because her endocrinologist said “getting pregnant would fix it”. We need to get back in touch with our intuition, and stop ignoring your period.

What kind of words do you associate with it? Are you trying to get pregnant and dread that time?  Are you “postpartum” and can’t seem to find a good normal?  Have you been able to learn to love it? What are your favorite ways?

Any of this sound like what you’d love to know?  Let me help you.  Schedule your Mama Wellness Breakthrough Session by clicking here.  Let’s get an action plan going for your specific period needs.

Seeds for Hormone Health

foods for fertility

There are all kinds of things you can do to help balance hormones before, during and after baby.  Herbs, supplements, yoga, meditation, medication.  But one of the simplest is to increase foods in your diet that help to remove excess estrogen, protect the body from xenohormones (synthetics that bind with estrogen receptor sites and inhibit the liver’s ability to remove excess estrogen), contain blood nourishing iron and vitamin C to help with iron absorption, and omegas for healthy cell membranes.

Some of my favorite foods for this are a few easy-to-eat seeds. Pumpkin seeds are high in zinc which helps to support progesterone release and also omega-3 fatty acids.  Flax seeds are high in lignans and omegas, helping to block excess estrogen.  Sesame seeds are also high in lignans and sunflower seeds contain selenium – a trace mineral that aids the liver in detoxification.  Best if eaten raw, (and especially in the case of flax seed – ground), added in small amounts daily to smoothies, yogurt, or soaked cereals.   I have been craving pumpkin seeds the entire 14 weeks of this pregnancy so far!